An Interesting Article on Introverts by Carl King

10 Myths About Introverts

I must say it’s quite well put. I could even find myself nodding my head when reading a few of them. Read on.

Myth #1 – Introverts don’t like to talk.
This is not true. Introverts just don’t talk unless they have something to say. They hate small talk. Get an introvert talking about something they are interested in, and they won’t shut up for days.

Myth #2 – Introverts are shy.
Shyness has nothing to do with being an Introvert. Introverts are not necessarily afraid of people. What they need is a reason to interact. They don’t interact for the sake of interacting. If you want to talk to an Introvert, just start talking. Don’t worry about being polite.

Myth #3 – Introverts are rude.
Introverts often don’t see a reason for beating around the bush with social pleasantries. They want everyone to just be real and honest. Unfortunately, this is not acceptable in most settings, so Introverts can feel a lot of pressure to fit in, which they find exhausting.

Myth #4 – Introverts don’t like people.
On the contrary, Introverts intensely value the few friends they have. They can count their close friends on one hand. If you are lucky enough for an introvert to consider you a friend, you probably have a loyal ally for life. Once you have earned their respect as being a person of substance, you’re in.

Myth #5 – Introverts don’t like to go out in public.
Nonsense. Introverts just don’t like to go out in public FOR AS LONG. They also like to avoid the complications that are involved in public activities. They take in data and experiences very quickly, and as a result, don’t need to be there for long to “get it.” They’re ready to go home, recharge, and process it all. In fact, recharging is absolutely crucial for Introverts.

Myth #6 – Introverts always want to be alone.
Introverts are perfectly comfortable with their own thoughts. They think a lot. They daydream. They like to have problems to work on, puzzles to solve. But they can also get incredibly lonely if they don’t have anyone to share their discoveries with. They crave an authentic and sincere connection with ONE PERSON at a time.

Myth #7 – Introverts are weird.
Introverts are often individualists. They don’t follow the crowd. They’d prefer to be valued for their novel ways of living. They think for themselves and because of that, they often challenge the norm. They don’t make most decisions based on what is popular or trendy.

Myth #8 – Introverts are aloof nerds.
Introverts are people who primarily look inward, paying close attention to their thoughts and emotions. It’s not that they are incapable of paying attention to what is going on around them, it’s just that their inner world is much more stimulating and rewarding to them.

Myth #9 – Introverts don’t know how to relax and have fun.
Introverts typically relax at home or in nature, not in busy public places. Introverts are not thrill seekers and adrenaline junkies. If there is too much talking and noise going on, they shut down. Their brains are too sensitive to the neurotransmitter called Dopamine. Introverts and Extroverts have different dominant neuro-pathways. Just look it up.

Myth #10 – Introverts can fix themselves and become Extroverts.
A world without Introverts would be a world with few scientists, musicians, artists, poets, filmmakers, doctors, mathematicians, writers, and philosophers. That being said, there are still plenty of techniques an Extrovert can learn in order to interact with Introverts. (Yes, I reversed these two terms on purpose to show you how biased our society is.) Introverts cannot “fix themselves” and deserve respect for their natural temperament and contributions to the human race. In fact, one study (Silverman, 1986) showed that the percentage of Introverts increases with IQ.

Mulling things over: A job and a life!

Sometimes when I look back at the life I’ve made for myself, I feel a tinge of both sadness and frustration. This feeling reaches its peak when I question myself about all the decisions I’ve taken which in turn have led to my present life. To be more specific, my current profession! If you look at it from an outsider’s perspective it’s not so bad, an engineer working at a global organization on a core job with a decent pay. The only glitch in this equation is that I do my job because I am trained to do it and not because I love it. As the saying goes, “Life is always much more successfully looked at from a single window”. To see reality as it is, you need to step outside the world of the person in question and then look at it in its entirety. This problem which keeps tormenting me now and again is one I am quite sure, faced by a lot of people today.

Most Indian kids, at least the ones in my world are brought up and educated in a manner so as to land a secure job. It does not matter whether you like what you are doing. All that counts is that you have a respectable, well-paying and stable job. We are conditioned by society from a very small age to find happiness in what we do, rather than pursuing something which we would actually love doing. In fact, we are so busy caught up in executing and following up on this rat race that we never find the time to ask ourselves what we truly want. We are even programmed so as not to let our minds wander along such directions, as they are perceived to be dangerous by our parents/society.

There are so many kids out there who discover their true calling but end up doing something completely different thanks to their parents and the society. For instance consider the case of this friend of mine. He was a brilliant writer with exceptional general knowledge and was considering journalism as a profession. He wrote his parents telling them about his decision only to get a sixteen page letter convincing him otherwise. He capitulated owing to the pressure and ended up doing engineering like the rest of us. Then again, we can’t completely point fingers at our parents or their generation as the situation in their case was very different. We have the luxury of choosing a job now whereas, during their time, landing a job itself was a lifetime achievement. They probably have this in mind when they trace the course of their child’s future.

Moving on, my own case turned out to be slightly better compared to my friend , for I never did find out what I truly wanted to do with life. Yes, there were the few times when I questioned myself about what I’d like to do and yes, I did come up with some fantastic answers too, after my so-called deliberations. There was the time that I got inspired listening to my English teacher and I wanted to take up Arts. Also there was the time when I wanted to do psychology and philosophy thanks to my stay with the monks during college. I even wanted to become an officer in the navy at a certain point. Then there is the ridiculous dream of doing some menial job in a beautiful country, a thought which creeps into my mind even now. Most of these feelings turned out to be temporary, playing their part until they fizzled out, leaving me in a state of limbo. The persistent ones, I pursued only to find out that they were no better than the former.

It’s been a couple of years now, working as an engineer and trying to find some sort of happiness doing it. At the same time I’ve been trying my hand at different stuff, dabbling at this and that. Who knows, one day I might just stumble across something I like doing. This blog here, is one such activity. It’s such a rewarding experience to be a writer, isn’t it? I mean when the blues hit me I can just immerse myself in writing and for that moment, completely forget everything else. So far so good! 🙂

My Favourite Five!

    

If my life had any leitmotivs, books would no doubt be “numero uno” among them. It is to them that I owe most of my convictions and it is to them that I retreat for solace when the blues hit me. They’ve given me so many friends in the form of the characters inside them, who’ve kept me company through the various legs of life. Some of them I grew out of, but there are a few who are etched in my memory forever. They are part of me now and sometimes it is to these immortal figures, I look for advice when faced with a situation similar to the ones they did.

I’ve always wanted to share and write about the characters who have influenced me at some point or the other, the ones who have left a lasting impression in me. Since there are so many of them, I’ve decided to pick five of my most favorite ones.

1)Mr. Chips

Chips as he was fondly called by everyone around him is the protagonist in “Goodbye Mr.Chips”, a book written by James Hilton. Chips embodied all the principles I valued at the time I read the book. He was a gentle soul, warm and endearing. The book showcases his life as a school teacher at Brookfield, a fictional British boys’ public boarding school of the Victorian order.

2)Edmond Dantes

Everyone knows this man by his alias “The Count of Monte Cristo“, the title character and protagonist of Alexandre Dumas’ magnum opus. I must confess that I literally worshiped Edmond after reading the book. In fact I even remember plotting revenge against imaginary enemies the next few days. The ingenious manner in which he avenged himself is without doubt the perfect example for the phrase “Revenge is a dish best served cold” .

3)Conor Larkin

Another hero, who was part of my childhood for quite some time. Conor is the lead character of Trinity, written by Leon Uris. Conor was part of the Irish movement for independence. He was an architect, a farmer, a romantic and a revolutionary, the perfect combination of brain and brawn. Hats off to Uris for creating this masterpiece of a character.

4)Papillon

This was Henry Charrière’s eponymous novel about his exploits on escaping from a French penal settlement where he was a prisoner. Papi narrates the whole story in first person which makes it all the more easier to understand the thoughts running inside him. He matures as the book progresses and it almost feels like you are in his shoes as his thought process changes over the years from gutsy to wise.

5)Sydney Carton

The so called “jackal”, Carton is a character appearing in “A Tale of Two Cities” written by Charles Dickens. A brilliant young man and a wastrel, his unrequited love for the female lead in the book is heartrending. Those words of his when he faces the guillotine haunt me even to this day.

“ It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known. ”